QUESTIONS TO ANSWER:

QUESTIONS TO ANSWER:
< What does it mean to be free? Are there different types of freedom? What forces < or circumstances might threaten one’s freedom? Choose one story that addresses this < theme and discuss how the author goes about promoting a particular view of the subject? < What does the author want readers to understand? < < STORIES YOU CAN CHOOSE FROM, ANY STORY IS FINE: < Chris Adrian – “Stab” < Shirley Jackson – “The Lottery” < Stephen King – “All that You Love will be Carried Away” < Ursula K. LeGuin – “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas” < Nancy Kress – “Nano Comes to Clifford Falls” < Maureen McHugh – “After the Apocalypse” < Charlotte Perkins Gilman – “The Yellow Wallpaper” < Eric Frank Russell – “And Then There Were None” < < BASIC INSTRUCTIONS: MUST INCLUDE ATLEAST 3 SOURCES ON A WORKS CITED PAGE SEPERATE FROM THE 3 WRITEN PAGES. (3 FULL WITING PAGES AND 1 SOURCE PAGE IN MLA FORMAT) < < 1. Length: The essay should be between three (3) and five (5) pages long. This means the < essay should be at least three complete pages long. Writing two and a half pages does not < satisfy this requirement. < 2. Font: Use Times New Roman font, size 12. < 3. Margins: Use margins of one inch. Microsoft Word defaults to 1.25 inches, so be sure to < change this. < 4. Spacing: Double-space your paper. Some word processing programs will leave extra < space (or no space) between paragraphs; you may need to adjust the settings, to avoid this < problem. < 5. Justification: Use left (not right or full) justification. < 6. Paragraph indentation: Indent the first line of each paragraph. < 7. Documentation: Document all of your sources on a Works Cited page. This page is in < addition to the three page minimum for the essay. The Works Cited page should include < an entry for the story being discussed, in addition to any secondary sources. < 8. Do not include a cover page. < 9. In other respects, your essay should follow MLA format guidelines. < Content Guidelines < 1. Demonstrate clear, logical, insightful, original thinking about the assigned topic. < 2. Whichever option you choose be sure to state your thesis clearly. Have a very clear sense < of what you want your readers to learn from your essay. Make sure the thesis states what < the body of the paper actually supports. < 3. Assume readers already know the plot of each story. Work to keep summarizing to a < minimum. < 4. Be sure to distinguish between plot and theme. < 5. Support your thesis with at least three supporting points. Provide and discuss the < significance of evidence for each point. < 6. Provide examples from the story to illustrate and support your claims. Include a < minimum of two (2) direct quotes from the story. < 7. Avoid tangents and overly long quotes or summaries. < 8. Consult at least (3) three secondary sources of information relating to the story under < consideration. For example, if you to discuss the theme of medical ethics, you might < make use of three sources of information on the topic of medical ethics. You might also < make use of the work of other literary or cultural critics. < 9. Include in-text citations for information gathered from the story and each of the three < additional sources. < 10. You should have an interesting and informative title that clearly and specifically reflects < the content of the essay (and especially of the thesis). < a. Do NOT underline or italicize the title of your own essay or place it in quotation < marks. < b. Center the title. < 11. Provide an introduction that includes a “hook” to get readers interested. < 12. Each body paragraph should have a clear focus and support the thesis of your essay. < 13. Use appropriate transitions between each section of your essay. < 14. When you refer to the plots and characters of the works in your own words, use present < tense verbs. When you quote, leave verb tense as it is in the story. < 15. Use descriptive language to enrich your interpretation. < 16. Documentation: Observe the following form for quotations and parenthetical < documentation. < a. Smoothly introduce all quotations; don’t just begin quoting. < i. Like this: In “The Wife’s Lament,” the speaker grieves the loss of her < relationship with her husband: “Our friendship is as if it had never been” < (114). < ii. NOT like this: “Our friendship is as if it had never been” (114). < b. When parenthetical documentation immediately follows quotation marks, drop < the punctuation mark at the end of the quotation (with the exception of a question < mark or exclamation point), and after the parenthetical documentation place the < punctuation your own sentence requires. < i. Like this: The Wanderer laments, “All delight has gone” (112). < ii. NOT like this: The Wanderer laments, “All delight has gone.” (112) < iii. Like this: The Wanderer asks, “Where is the giver of treasure?” (113). < iv. NOT like this: The Wanderer asks, “Where is the giver of treasure” (113)? < 17. Editing and Proofreading: Revise, edit, and proofread your essay carefully. Be sure to < use spell-check. Work to avoid editing oversights, such as spelling and punctuation < mistakes, documentation mistakes, sentence fragments, comma splices, run-on sentences, < and subject-verb agreement errors. < <